Plug-in devices offer immediate boost to wireless signal strength

NetComm , a leading Australian provider of communications products and solutions, has announced a new range of Wireless Boosters that plug into an existing wireless router or wireless access point to boost the signal. The result is a massive increase to the available range and coverage area of a wireless signal.

NetComm , a leading Australian provider of communications products and solutions, has announced a new range of Wireless Boosters that plug into an existing wireless router or wireless access point to boost the signal. The result is a massive increase to the available range and coverage area of a wireless signal.

The boosters work similar to an amplifier for stereo speakers, the more power output the greater the effective range," said David Stewart , Managing Director, NetComm. "Most typical wireless routers and access points have a power output somewhere between 20-50mW our basic indoor wireless booster outputs 200mW."

"You hear a lot of claims about products being plug and play' but NetComm's Wireless Boosters are the real deal you literally just plug them in and they work immediately", said Jon Lobendahn, Apples & Oranges, reseller and wireless hotspot operator. "For businesses generating revenue from wireless hotspots, this carries the added benefit of expanding their coverage area so they can serve more customers and generate additional revenue. These products spread the footprint of our wireless hotspot to the furthest distance we have ever seen".

There are four models available in the range with two indoor boosters (200mW and 500mW) and two outdoor boosters (500mW and 1,000mW)

The indoor booster units are slightly larger than the size of a matchbox and will fit between any wireless router or access point with an SMA connector and its detachable antenna . There are also a range of adaptors available for other aerial types.

"The boosters will be a revolution for anyone using wireless who has experienced problems with range and physical barriers preventing good coverage," said David Stewart . "In fact, testing by our engineers has shown very surprising results including signals passing through concrete walls and over several levels of a building."